History and stuff....
nyhistory:

On July 25, 1953, New York City’s subway fare was raised to 15 cents. Instead of making subway riders have three nickels each time, the city introduced the subway token, which became a symbol of the city until it was phased out for the MetroCard in 2003.
Subway token, 1979, metal. New-York Historical Society, Gift of Bella C. Landauer

nyhistory:

On July 25, 1953, New York City’s subway fare was raised to 15 cents. Instead of making subway riders have three nickels each time, the city introduced the subway token, which became a symbol of the city until it was phased out for the MetroCard in 2003.

Subway token, 1979, metal. New-York Historical Society, Gift of Bella C. Landauer

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41
Posted
1 month ago
historynet:

Trumpeter’s George Gritten and W. Lang with a Russian eagle flagstaff, which was brought back to England as a war trophy, 1856 [645 × 800]

historynet:

Trumpeter’s George Gritten and W. Lang with a Russian eagle flagstaff, which was brought back to England as a war trophy, 1856 [645 × 800]

Notes
8
Posted
1 month ago
historynet:

The Masonic Temple was built in 1891 and at 302 ft was the tallest building in Chicago between 1895 and 1899. The building was demolished in 1939 due to its small elevators and the construction of the State street subway. (1901) Chicago, IL [808 x 1,024]

historynet:

The Masonic Temple was built in 1891 and at 302 ft was the tallest building in Chicago between 1895 and 1899. The building was demolished in 1939 due to its small elevators and the construction of the State street subway. (1901) Chicago, IL [808 x 1,024]

Notes
10
Posted
1 month ago
mapsontheweb:

North America in 1783
Homesanto:

The accepted boundaries in 1783, after the Revolutionary War. New Orleans still under dispute. Map was drawn by Robert M.Chapin, Jr., published in the Making of Modern America, a high school text book, published in 1950 by Houghton Mifflin Company.

mapsontheweb:

North America in 1783

Homesanto:

The accepted boundaries in 1783, after the Revolutionary War. New Orleans still under dispute. Map was drawn by Robert M.Chapin, Jr., published in the Making of Modern America, a high school text book, published in 1950 by Houghton Mifflin Company.

Notes
457
Posted
1 month ago

livelymorgue:

Jan. 9, 1955: Dwight D. Eisenhower, the 34th president, spoke to reporters and cameramen on his Gettysburg, Pa., farm. It was unclear if the president had confiscated this camera or wanted a photo of the scrum for himself. Apparently, he had a temper, evidenced in a 1969 article: “Once he topped a tee shot at Augusta and flared up in such anger that Richard Flohr, his Secret Service guard, grew alarmed. Mr. Flohr ran to the general and, in the manner of a top sergeant talking to a buck private, shouted: ‘Now you just cut that out right now, Mr. President. And I mean cut it out, or I’m going to put you in that cart and take you right back to the cottage and lock you in.’ ” His Gettysburg home seemed to have a mellowing effect. Photo: George Tames/The New York Times

(via retrocampaigns)

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171
Posted
1 month ago
In 1972, Georgia Gov. Jimmy Carter visited Brazil and remarked on the similarity between American Southerners and Confederados, descendants of Confederates who immigrated to Brazil after the Civil War.

In 1972, Georgia Gov. Jimmy Carter visited Brazil and remarked on the similarity between American Southerners and Confederados, descendants of Confederates who immigrated to Brazil after the Civil War.

Posted
1 month ago
indypendenthistory:

March 5, 1917. Woodrow Wilson and his wife Edith Bolling Wilson riding in the backseat of a carriage on their way to his second inauguration.
(via http://lightbox.time.com/2013/02/17/bringing-color-to-presidents-past/#1)

indypendenthistory:

March 5, 1917. Woodrow Wilson and his wife Edith Bolling Wilson riding in the backseat of a carriage on their way to his second inauguration.

(via http://lightbox.time.com/2013/02/17/bringing-color-to-presidents-past/#1)

Notes
27
Posted
3 months ago
retrocampaigns:

1868, the "Reconstruction Election," was marked by pretty blatant appeals to racism, as in the ribbon above.
The Republicans and their candidate,  Radical Republican Ulysses S. Grant, supported voting and citizenship rights for blacks.
The Democratic ticket of Horatio Seymour and Francis Blair proved no match in the election, not even with help from the Klan.
Via Heritage Auction

retrocampaigns:

1868, the "Reconstruction Election," was marked by pretty blatant appeals to racism, as in the ribbon above.

The Republicans and their candidate, Radical Republican Ulysses S. Grant, supported voting and citizenship rights for blacks.

The Democratic ticket of Horatio Seymour and Francis Blair proved no match in the election, not even with help from the Klan.

Via Heritage Auction

Notes
42
Posted
3 months ago

retrocampaigns:

It’s the veep, Richard Nixon, pumping gas for a March of Dimes charity event in 1955. As the British Pathé film notes: Nixon was an old hand at the pump, having worked at his father’s gas station as a teenager.

Credit: British Pathé Ltd. Check them out on Tumblr, too.

Notes
89
Posted
3 months ago
mapsontheweb:

Freeway plan for Los Angeles area in 1955, and current LA highway network

mapsontheweb:

Freeway plan for Los Angeles area in 1955, and current LA highway network

Notes
48
Posted
3 months ago
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